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Westside for Skinny Bastards, Part III

Joe DeFranco of DeFranco’s Training is a leader in the no bullshit type strength and conditioning that has gained popularity over the past several years. Work hard, get results, end of story. Joe’s third and final installment of Westside for Skinny Bastards is awesome and you should check it out. The program is a super detailed, easy to follow plan all laid out for you, just follow along and get bigger and stronger.

From Joe DeFranco: WS4SB

After a year of answering questions about my original article and making modifications to it in the gym with my athletes, I decided to write Part 2. In that second installment, I discussed how to incorporate running workouts into the original training template. Another two years have passed now, and the avalanche of questions involving WS4SB continues to kill my inbox! This is what prompted me to sit down and provide more answers to the most common questions people have been asking. In this, my third and final chapter, I will clarify the following:

  • A new 4-day-a-week strength training template for the off-season
  • Explanation of warm-up sets
  • New ways to incorporate speed training and conditioning into the program
  • Sample in-season training templates
  • Bonus “Washed-up Meathead” template
  • The importance of including “indicator” exercises in your program

The Plan:

4-DAY STRENGTH TRAINING TEMPLATE

My original Skinny Bastard template consisted of three strength training days with an optional fourth day. Although a 3-day template is sufficient for building size and strength, I quickly realized that most people want to train more. WS4SB3 will now provide you with a 4-day strength training template. It’s been over three years since I wrote the original article, so it’s about time you skinny bastards graduated to a 4-day split that more closely resembles a “traditional” Westside split! First, I’ll reveal the new and improved template. After that, I’ll go over the specific details you’ll need to know.

MONDAYMax-Effort Upper Body
TUESDAYDynamic-Effort Lower Body
WEDNESDAY – Off
THURSDAYRepetition Upper Body
FRIDAYMax-Effort Lower Body
SATURDAY – Off
SUNDAYOff

You can also split up the training like this…

MONDAYMax-Effort Lower Body
TUESDAYOff
WEDNESDAYMax-Effort Upper Body
THURSDAYOff
FRIDAYDynamic-Effort Lower Body
SATURDAYOff
SUNDAYRepetition Upper Body

Now that the new template is in place, I’ll reveal the changes I’ve made since my original article…

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Canola (Con-ola) Controversy

Guest Post by Marc Adlam

An interesting discussion came up yesterday about canola oil.  Is it good or not?  It gets a stamp of approval from all the official diet authorities, but the underground rumor is that it’s no good for you. A little research reveals that the naysayers may have it, but it is hard to say for sure.  If you want to get the full story, check out “The Great Con-ola” by Sally Fallon and Mary Emig, PhD. It is interesting to learn that the word “canola” is purely a marketing invention.  The word was designed to reflect the idea of “Canadian oil” because it was a Canadian who first learned how to genetically manipulate the rapeseed to reduce its levels of toxic erucic acid. They had originally called it LEAR oil (for Low Erucic Acid Rapeseed oil), but that didn’t have much marketing appeal.  Meanwhile, “canola” evoked images of “can do” and “payola” — both of which evoked positive marketing images.  And thus an industry was born! Again, the jury is still out on canola oil at the end of the day.  However, we tend to agree with Mark Sisson in this post suggesting to avoid canola oil altogether when there are so many better options out there:  olive oil, lard, ghee, butter, coconut oil, walnut oil, avocado oil, macadamia nut oil, etc.

Besides, as he also points out, it seems a bit strange to ingest any food that has to be deodorized before you’ll buy it.  That just doesn’t seem right, does it?

http://www.westonaprice.org/health-topics/the-great-con-ola/

http://www.marksdailyapple.com/dear-mark-canola-oil/#axzz3Eo2x22aY

Andre Galvao BJJ Mobility Drills

 

Here is a cool little clip of Andre Galvao performing some mobility drills for BJJ.

Greyskull Barbell Linear Progression

Strength Villain and the Greyskull Barbell Linear Progression. This program seems to work for pretty much anyone and everyone I have talked to about it. Check it out for yourself and have fun. Below is just a quick overview of the program but you can find the details in the above link. Gotta pay to play.

Monday
Bench/ or Press (A/B) 2x 5, 1 x 5+
Curl 2x 10-15 (bench days)
Squat 2x 5, 1x 5+
Neck Harness

Wednesday
Bench/ or Press 2×5, 1x 5+
Weighted Chins 2 x 6-8 (press days, and only if you can do at least 6-8 BW chins)
Deadlift 1x 5+ (with or without power cleans as warmups)
Neck Harness

Friday
Bench/ or Press (A/B) 2x 5, 1 x 5+
Curl 2x 10-15 (bench days)
Squat 2x 5, 1x 5+
Neck Harness

Bodyweight Chins are done every day.
5 lb jumps on Squat and Deadlift
2.5lb jumps on pressing movements and curls (when rep ranges are satisfied)
When reps on last set fall below 5, take 10% off of bar and begin process over (on that lift only)

Online Coaches (The 4 Golden Rules)

 

Throwback Thursday article regarding the surge in online coaches; this was written by two well known people in the industry, Dave Tate (Elite FTS) and John Meadows. Enjoy!

“With the recent surge in online coaches, I thought I would share a little something Dave Tate and I put together (mostly Dave) to help you assess if someone is worthy of your hard earned dough.
Here are the 4 Golden Rules:
1. What is their education? … Do they have a degree? In a related field? BS, Masters, PHD? Certifications? Continuing Education? Internships? Work History? Mentors? Self Thought? It’s very important that they understand how to translate education, studies, etc into actual client scenarios too. This is critical. On a scale of 1-5 where do they rank? 5 would be advanced degree, internship and 2-3 very good mentors. Work back from there. If they are only self thought they get a 1 or 2. 2.
2. What have they done? Do they lift? Did they play sports? What level? How long? How long to get to the top level? How long did they stay at top level? What adversity did they face? If they are so good at coaching, they should have at least been able to get results with themself.
A 5 would be the person who busted ass for years to get into the top 10%. They faced adversity and had to earn every pound and sacrificed and paid a price for it. A 1 would be the person who did nothing. A 2 would be the genetic freak/anomoly who hit the top fast and never really faced adversity.
3. Who have they trained? Who are their clients? Do they have any? Did they ever have any? What hands on experience do they have? Have they created people better than they were? Have they worked with beginners? Intermediate? Advanced?
A 5 would have worked with every skill level and has made people better than they were (are). They have years of experience doing so and have many tools in the box. A 1 lies about who they have trained. I also wouldn’t give a 5 to those who only work with advanced or pro athletes. A real coaches knows not just how to work with pros but also how to create them.
4. Who coached them and who have they trained with? Do they know how to listen? Follow directions? Were they coached by the best or by nobody at all? Have they trained with champions (it rubs off). Do they know when to drive and push hard and when to back down? Do they know how a squat should look, feel and sound? Do they know basic gym manners.
A 5 has been coached by the best and has learned respect for it. A one has never been coached by anyone who pushed them hard, disagreed with and learned to respect. Typically these are know it alls. Avoid at all costs. If you find a perfect 20 its REALLY rare. The goal would be to find a 16 or better. They won’t be cheap but they will get you where you need to go and the extra money you do spend will be nothing compared to the medical expense and downtime working with a 12 or below. Hope this helps.”

Rack Chat: Goals, Vids, and More

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I wanted to post up some recent workout vids I took over the past few weeks or so. I really don’t have any specific goals planned with the exception of breaking past my old PR on deadlift at 350lbs. I pulled an easy 345# last week and was capable of more but decided to leave it at that. Otherwise, just looking to pack on some size and lower my BF % a bit. I am hanging in at around 185lbs which is almost an ideal weight for me as I don’t have any desire to be much heavier. As with most 30+ year olds I am battling various issues in and around my pelvic region; I work a FT job that plops me in a chair for nearly half the day. Couple that with an hour in the car and my hamstrings, hip flexors, and lower back are a constant battle for me. I continue to do my dynamic warm ups, foam rolling, and post workout stretching which has provided a bit of relief. As with anything, I need to stay consistent or it is all out the door. Thanks for listening.

 

 

Too Fit for Planet Fitness

JFZ

There is some more fun news circuiting the internet regarding a woman that was told to cover herself up at Planet Fitness for being “too toned”. I think Planet Fitness needs to really re-evaluate its “Judgment Free Zone” slogan plastered all over their walls as it seems to me that is ALL they do to gym goers. Surprisingly enough, people still join this worthless excuse for a gym which leaves me dumbfounded.

The Article Link

Grabbing Bars – Hitting PR’s

Picture 112

It has been a while since I have hit a solid PR on the conventional deadlift. I believe the last “real” PR I had was back in 2012 when I hit 350lbs x 1. Last week I hit 315 x 2 which I am unsure if I had done before. In years past, I never doubled any weight over 300lbs as I was usually working towards a heavy single vs. heavy double. This week I decided that I wanted to hit 315lbs x 2 again, which felt easy. So,  I decided to bump it up another 10lbs to hit a solid 325lbs x 2 PR. It actually felt really good and I want to continue to push through these heavy weights with a goal of hitting over 350lbs again for a single. I edited the full video (you can kind of catch the beginning part) but my face was priceless when I finished the lift; It was like huh, I actually did it.

Rack Chat: Trap Bar or Barbell Deadlift?

We all know the deadlift is a great strength building exercise, there is no argument there. But, I do understand why people avoid the exercise either while coaching or performing in their own routine. It is a somewhat difficult exercise to teach/learn, and if done incorrectly could pose potential problems with the lumbar spine area. With that said, if a coach does not teach deadlifts because of the potential learning curve than they are just being lazy. Not every exercise is going to be picked up in the first day, and the deadlift is no exception. I have been teaching the deadlift long enough to know it may take over a month to get your athlete to perform the deadlift in “acceptable” mode, acceptable meaning not perfect but also not injury inducing. The NSCA Journal did a research study on doing deadlifts with the trap bar, as well as the traditional barbell deadlfit. Much of the information was somewhat predictable, and somewhat known already, but I still enjoy reading studies to reaffirm what we all have been teaching to others.

Here is an exerpt from the NSCA article, precise and to the point:

“If the goal is to maximize recruitment of the erector spinae muscles and specifically target the lumbar area, the results of this study suggest that the deadlift should be performed with the straight barbell.”

“Strength and conditioning coaches searching for an alternative to the squat may find the deadlift performed with the hexagonal barbell to be an effective alternative. For individuals with a history of lower back pain or currently in the final stages of rehabilitation, performing the deadlift with the hexagonal barbell rather than the straight barbell may be a more prudent strategy to target the lumbar area while more evenly distributing the load between the joints of the body.”

Beast of the Week: Andrey Malanichev

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I have been a big fan of Andrey Malanichev for years. He recently competed at the GPA world championships and went 435/260/405 for 1100kg @ 146kg, raw (with wraps). That’s 959/573/892 – 2425lb @ 321lbs, which is a world record number.

“Andrey skipped his opener because he wasn’t done warming up yet. He took 435kgs-959lbs as his first squat on the 2nd attempts and it was a very fast, easy lift. He jumped to 455kgs-1,003lbs on his last attempt to try and break the all time highest raw squat ever in history. He finished the lift just as easy as his first, but it was a no lift. I’m still not sure why though? He destroyed that lift. -Eric Lilliebridge”

It is with great confidence that we vote Andrey Malanichev as this weeks Beast of the Week. I am sure we will continue to see this powerful Russian destroy  lifts on his way to more records.

Here are the clips from the meet:

Squat:

Deadlift:

Compilation: Including Bench Press Lift