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Westside for Skinny Bastards, Part III

Joe DeFranco of DeFranco’s Training is a leader in the no bullshit type strength and conditioning that has gained popularity over the past several years. Work hard, get results, end of story. Joe’s third and final installment of Westside for Skinny Bastards is awesome and you should check it out. The program is a super detailed, easy to follow plan all laid out for you, just follow along and get bigger and stronger.

From Joe DeFranco: WS4SB

After a year of answering questions about my original article and making modifications to it in the gym with my athletes, I decided to write Part 2. In that second installment, I discussed how to incorporate running workouts into the original training template. Another two years have passed now, and the avalanche of questions involving WS4SB continues to kill my inbox! This is what prompted me to sit down and provide more answers to the most common questions people have been asking. In this, my third and final chapter, I will clarify the following:

  • A new 4-day-a-week strength training template for the off-season
  • Explanation of warm-up sets
  • New ways to incorporate speed training and conditioning into the program
  • Sample in-season training templates
  • Bonus “Washed-up Meathead” template
  • The importance of including “indicator” exercises in your program

The Plan:

4-DAY STRENGTH TRAINING TEMPLATE

My original Skinny Bastard template consisted of three strength training days with an optional fourth day. Although a 3-day template is sufficient for building size and strength, I quickly realized that most people want to train more. WS4SB3 will now provide you with a 4-day strength training template. It’s been over three years since I wrote the original article, so it’s about time you skinny bastards graduated to a 4-day split that more closely resembles a “traditional” Westside split! First, I’ll reveal the new and improved template. After that, I’ll go over the specific details you’ll need to know.

MONDAYMax-Effort Upper Body
TUESDAYDynamic-Effort Lower Body
WEDNESDAY – Off
THURSDAYRepetition Upper Body
FRIDAYMax-Effort Lower Body
SATURDAY – Off
SUNDAYOff

You can also split up the training like this…

MONDAYMax-Effort Lower Body
TUESDAYOff
WEDNESDAYMax-Effort Upper Body
THURSDAYOff
FRIDAYDynamic-Effort Lower Body
SATURDAYOff
SUNDAYRepetition Upper Body

Now that the new template is in place, I’ll reveal the changes I’ve made since my original article…

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Tosh.O Web Redemption – Weightlifting

Regardless of what you think of Daniel Tosh this segment was pretty damn funny.

http://tosh.cc.com/video-clips/6mstcf/web-redemption—weightlifting

Greyskull Barbell Linear Progression

Strength Villain and the Greyskull Barbell Linear Progression. This program seems to work for pretty much anyone and everyone I have talked to about it. Check it out for yourself and have fun. Below is just a quick overview of the program but you can find the details in the above link. Gotta pay to play.

Monday
Bench/ or Press (A/B) 2x 5, 1 x 5+
Curl 2x 10-15 (bench days)
Squat 2x 5, 1x 5+
Neck Harness

Wednesday
Bench/ or Press 2×5, 1x 5+
Weighted Chins 2 x 6-8 (press days, and only if you can do at least 6-8 BW chins)
Deadlift 1x 5+ (with or without power cleans as warmups)
Neck Harness

Friday
Bench/ or Press (A/B) 2x 5, 1 x 5+
Curl 2x 10-15 (bench days)
Squat 2x 5, 1x 5+
Neck Harness

Bodyweight Chins are done every day.
5 lb jumps on Squat and Deadlift
2.5lb jumps on pressing movements and curls (when rep ranges are satisfied)
When reps on last set fall below 5, take 10% off of bar and begin process over (on that lift only)

Workout Partners: The Good, The Bad, The Ugly

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Working out is one of your favorite things to do and you want to propel your gains to a level you have never reached before. Your first thought is how many supplements and food can I eat to make #gainz; your second thought however is how to properly choose a workout partner that will help you progress, get stronger, and push those heavy weights. There are a lot of positives and also negatives to workout partners, and this is coming from personal experience with both sides of the coin. Below I will present you with not only the pros and cons of workout partners, but also HOW to choose a proper workout partner based on your specific needs. Enjoy!

Pros:

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Spotting – Want a built in spotter for bench that knows your preferences and is always there to help you hit max weights, this is when a training partner is essential. I personally dislike asking people I don’t know for spots, because most of the time, they aren’t very good at it.

Accountability – There are a lot of people out there who wouldn’t set foot in a gym if it wasn’t for a workout partner motivating them to come. If you are the type of person who needs just a little push from others, a workout partner is almost essential.

davearb

Motivation  – There isn’t a person on earth who would say a good workout partner didn’t help them to make any serious gains. When I had a solid workout partner my bench was at around 320#, it hasn’t been at that weight since 2004, when I had my training partner. A good training partner gives you just enough push to hit weights you wouldn’t normally do on your own.

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Form Police – There is only one way to properly coach form and that is to see it from the outside looking in. You could video all of your lifts but even then a second pair of eyes could be beneficial. A good workout partner will keep his or her eyes on your form at all times and give and constructive criticism when necessary.

 Cons:

Consistency – Some people just don’t want to train as much as they say they do. Your success will suffer if you rely on a training partner who will actually only workout with you once or twice a week, if at all. If this is your training partner, ditch him or her, and train on your own or find a new buddy.

Flakiness – My last training partner would schedule days to go with me to the gym and then cancel the night of. I would then reschedule for another day HOPING he would actually commit. Ultimately, he continued to flake so I stopped reaching out and went to the gym alone.

guy-on-cell-phone-at-the-gym

Slackers – You may have a training partner who shows up to the gym on-time, every time, and meets all your overall criteria in a gym buddy but there’s just one thing you don’t like, they don’t workout. Its one thing to show up to a gym, its another thing to actually get the training volume in you prefer. I see it all over, training buddies more interested in talking than working. If this is your training partner, try to convert them or give them the boot!! Your success cannot ride on the shoulders of a gym slacker.

cardio-youll-loose

Goals – You and your training partner need to have similar goals. If your partner wants to do all cardio and you want to hit weights, its not going to work out. Find someone looking to get big like you because lets face it, you don’t do cardio.

So how does one choose the perfect workout partner, and frankly, how do you find them? Well, if you consider all the above criteria then it seems like it could be a difficult process. The answer is Yes and no. The first workout partner I had was a co-worker who had the exact same goals as I. He was training at a differnet gym so I said “come to my gym” and from there we started an awesome gym relationship. We pushed each other, had competitions for weight gain, weights pushed or pulled, and just had fun while getting much bigger. We would bounce supplement ideas off each other, what worked, what didn’t. He was always on time and showed up for every workout. He was one of the best training partners I have ever had. I have gone through about 3 others since then and only one other, another co-worker, had matched up perfectly (see above push up picture). My last one was flakey, didn’t work as hard, and was inconsistent. He was a bomb and I dropped him and started working out by myself again. So, pick someone with similar goals, is on time, works hard, and pushes you to make gains safely. When you find this person, and where you find this person is up to you, but they are out there but choose wisely. Make them #gainz!

Battle of the Champions 2014

Battle-of-Champions

Really cool vids from the practice of the Battle of the Champions powerlifting comp hosted in Russia. I posted the results below.

Final results of the “Battle of Champions-2014″ Arkhangelsk, Russia
cash prize – $100.000
Benchpres RAW
1 – Kirill Sarychev (Russia) 326kg (719 lb) b/w 179kg (393.8 lb)
2 – Roman Eremashvili (Belarus) 218kg (479,6 lb) b/w 67,4kg (148.3 lb)
3 – Laslo Mezharosh (Hungary) 295kg (649 lb) b/w 132,5kg (291.5 lb)

Deadlift RAW
1 – Andrey Belyaev (Russia), 395kg (869 lb) b/w 89,9kg (197.7 lb)
2 – Konstantin Pozdeev (Russia) 405kg (891 lb) b/w 103kg (226.6 lb)
3 – Sergey Daragan (Russia) 403,5kg (887.7 lb) b/w 119,2kg (262.24 lb)

 

Online Coaches (The 4 Golden Rules)

 

Throwback Thursday article regarding the surge in online coaches; this was written by two well known people in the industry, Dave Tate (Elite FTS) and John Meadows. Enjoy!

“With the recent surge in online coaches, I thought I would share a little something Dave Tate and I put together (mostly Dave) to help you assess if someone is worthy of your hard earned dough.
Here are the 4 Golden Rules:
1. What is their education? … Do they have a degree? In a related field? BS, Masters, PHD? Certifications? Continuing Education? Internships? Work History? Mentors? Self Thought? It’s very important that they understand how to translate education, studies, etc into actual client scenarios too. This is critical. On a scale of 1-5 where do they rank? 5 would be advanced degree, internship and 2-3 very good mentors. Work back from there. If they are only self thought they get a 1 or 2. 2.
2. What have they done? Do they lift? Did they play sports? What level? How long? How long to get to the top level? How long did they stay at top level? What adversity did they face? If they are so good at coaching, they should have at least been able to get results with themself.
A 5 would be the person who busted ass for years to get into the top 10%. They faced adversity and had to earn every pound and sacrificed and paid a price for it. A 1 would be the person who did nothing. A 2 would be the genetic freak/anomoly who hit the top fast and never really faced adversity.
3. Who have they trained? Who are their clients? Do they have any? Did they ever have any? What hands on experience do they have? Have they created people better than they were? Have they worked with beginners? Intermediate? Advanced?
A 5 would have worked with every skill level and has made people better than they were (are). They have years of experience doing so and have many tools in the box. A 1 lies about who they have trained. I also wouldn’t give a 5 to those who only work with advanced or pro athletes. A real coaches knows not just how to work with pros but also how to create them.
4. Who coached them and who have they trained with? Do they know how to listen? Follow directions? Were they coached by the best or by nobody at all? Have they trained with champions (it rubs off). Do they know when to drive and push hard and when to back down? Do they know how a squat should look, feel and sound? Do they know basic gym manners.
A 5 has been coached by the best and has learned respect for it. A one has never been coached by anyone who pushed them hard, disagreed with and learned to respect. Typically these are know it alls. Avoid at all costs. If you find a perfect 20 its REALLY rare. The goal would be to find a 16 or better. They won’t be cheap but they will get you where you need to go and the extra money you do spend will be nothing compared to the medical expense and downtime working with a 12 or below. Hope this helps.”

The Cost of Protein – Money Wasted Looking Great

Eating well costs money. One could easily live off ramen for a year and save quite a bit of money, but we won’t, because we are worth it. Instead, we are left to spend my money on lean beef,chicken, turkey, fish, veggies, fruit, and expensive healthy fats in order to eat clean.  There was an article years ago on 70’s Big  that breaks down here what the cost is for consumption of protein on a  daily, monthly, and yearly basis. The post is funny as hell, and really does make you realize how much you spend on keeping your physique in top form.

The Link:

http://70sbig.com/blog/2011/08/cost-of-protein/

Rack Chat: Hard Gainers

I wanted to revisit an article that Along the lines of posted years back regarding weight gain.  I am a hard gainer, and I know exactly where he is coming from when describing hard gainer questions about gaining weight. When I wanted to get bigger and was hovering around 170lbs soaking wet, I ate, and ate, and ate. I didn’t care what I ate, what was in it, how many calories it had, I just plowed through it. It a month or so I went from 170 to close to 200lbs. I think the moral of the story is, if you need to gain weight, eat foods that most people don’t eat because it makes them gain weight, and eat lots of it. Will you gain fat, yep, I did, and so did he.

Pictures

From the Article:

“I swiftly plumped up by eating copious amounts of breakfast food, my favorite food group.  I’ve talked to many “hard gainers” in my lifetime, each one proclaiming that they cannot gain a single pound no matter what they eat.  I usually have a hearty belly laugh.  Like this one.

Then I ask if they’ve tried eating large amounts of breakfast foods throughout the day.

“No.  How often?”

“Like all the time.”

“Won’t I get fat?”

“Yes.”

“But that’s not how bodybuilder’s do it.  I heard this bodybuilder friend that-”

“I don’t care.  You’re not a bodybuilder.  You just told me that you had trouble gaining weight, but now it sounds like you don’t want to do that.”

Yes, it would be great if we could all plan our meals well and eat clean and often like a bodybuilder.  But it’s expensive and time consuming.  Get the calories in.  Keep eating your fruits and veggies.  And have fun eating like a big guy.”

The Link:

http://alongthelinesof.com/2011/07/13/on-getting-fat/

Grabbing Bars – Hitting PR’s

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It has been a while since I have hit a solid PR on the conventional deadlift. I believe the last “real” PR I had was back in 2012 when I hit 350lbs x 1. Last week I hit 315 x 2 which I am unsure if I had done before. In years past, I never doubled any weight over 300lbs as I was usually working towards a heavy single vs. heavy double. This week I decided that I wanted to hit 315lbs x 2 again, which felt easy. So,  I decided to bump it up another 10lbs to hit a solid 325lbs x 2 PR. It actually felt really good and I want to continue to push through these heavy weights with a goal of hitting over 350lbs again for a single. I edited the full video (you can kind of catch the beginning part) but my face was priceless when I finished the lift; It was like huh, I actually did it.

Beast of the Week: Lou Ferrigno

If any of you have ever seen Pumping Iron (if you haven’t you need to) you will know that Lou Ferrigno was a force to be reckoned with. Lou put in work in his younger days as a professional bodybuilder, and frankly, has fared much better than his counterparts with age. He looked great back then, and looks great to this day, keep up the hard work big guy. At 6’5″ tall, and tipping the scales at 285lbs, Lou Ferrigno is this weeks Beast of the Week.

After graduating from high school in 1969, Ferrigno won his first major titles, IFBB Mr. America and IFBB Mr. Universe, four years later. Early in his career he lived in Columbus and trained with Arnold Schwarzenegger. In 1974, he came in second on his first attempt at the Mr. Olympia competition. He then came third the following year, and his attempt to beat Arnold Schwarzenegger was the subject of the 1975 documentary Pumping Iron.”